TSCA, Amended – One Year of Progress

Recently, Green Seal’s standards development team attended a conference on the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, which celebrated its 1-year anniversary. We greatly enjoyed the candid conversations between the heavy hitters: government officials, members of Congress, representatives from industry, and environmental advocates.

The bill was signed into law on June 22, 2016 by President Obama, and was widely proclaimed a success.

Soon after the signing, the usual political chatter began: cheers (a rare show of bipartisanship!), grumbles (the law was decades overdue), jitters (could the EPA handle the ambitious time lines?), shrugs and yawns (too many compromises). We, in Green Seal’s Washington, DC’s headquarters, sometimes enjoy the political opera, especially since we remain happily seated in the mezzanine. I, and my friends in the DC environmental community, were heartened by the news: the EPA now had greater authority, strict time lines for progress, and dependable funding sources for implementing effective chemical regulation.

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The Age of Plastics: A Chemical Introduction

LN Headshot2By Lisa Nash, Green Seal Administrative Assistant

 

 

 

graduate-plasticsI just want to say one word to you— just one word.

Yes, sir.

Are you listening?

Yes I am.

Plastics.

Exactly how do you mean?

There’s a great future in plastics. Think about it. Will you think about it?

Yes, I will.

Enough said. That’s a deal. – The Graduate (1967)

Ubiquity & Mystery

When it comes to plastics, there are typically two narratives that dominate the conversation: one of ubiquity and one of mystery. Hopefully, this blog post will eradicate the latter.

This comical 1967 scene from The Graduate takes place after plastics had already penetrated many different industries like the textile industry. The commercialization of plastics occurred much earlier during World War II when natural sources of latex, wool, silk, and other materials were cut off, making the use of synthetics critical. During this time period, we saw the use of nylon, acrylic, neoprene, SBR, polyethylene, and many more polymers take the place of natural materials that were no longer available. Yet this scene capitalizes on the overwhelming feeling that plastics’ potential is exceedingly endless. (more…)

A History of Food Packaging

By Lisa Nash, Administrative Assistant

Food packaging evolves with the progress of knowledge. Material discoveries, manufacturing developments, and new understandings of science shape the history of food packaging. Its developments usher in countless benefits like the improved health and safety of food distribution. Today, food packaging is extremely varied and can accommodate many different distribution needs ranging from food preservation to weight minimization. However, there is no one silver bullet when it comes to food packaging, so every decision has its share of tradeoffs. (more…)